There are one-pan dinners, and there are sheet-pan dinners. They both make sense. By limiting the cooking action to a single pan, there is less to wash up, which is a definite bonus at the end of a long day. But there’s a more important advantage: One-pan cooking ensures that every ingredient mingles together during the cooking process, sharing the spices and flavorings while contributing to the pan juices, which, in turn, promises a very tasty and comforting dish.

I’ve prepared this recipe in various iterations for years. It was originally inspired by a Bon Appetit recipe, and since then, I’ve tweaked and improvised it along the way. The key method remains the same: the whole lot is spread on a rimmed baking sheet at once, coated in a spicy garlic-infused oil, and then banished to the oven for just enough time to thoroughly cook the chicken. During the cooking process, the tomatoes cook down to a juicy sludge and melt into the pan juices, while the nubby chickpeas enjoy a bath in the fragrant sauce.

Before you know it — voila — you have a fragrant, saucy chicken dinner, ready in about 40 minutes, while most of that time is hands-off oven time. The flavorful sauce is the best part to this dish, so I serve the chicken over a bed of couscous to capture every drop, and serve the finished dish with a cooling dollop of spiced yogurt.

Sheet Pan Chicken Breasts with

Tomatoes and

Chickpeas

Active Time:

10 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients:

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

3 garlic cloves, minced

2 tablespoons finely chopped cilantro and/or mint

2 teaspoons smoked paprika

2 teaspoons sweet paprika

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

1/4 teaspoon cayenne or piment d’Espelette

Salt

4 large boneless chicken breasts, with skin, 6 to 8 ounces each

1 pound grape tomatoes

1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed

Yogurt Sauce:

1 cup Greek whole milk yogurt

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 small garlic clove, minced

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon cayenne or piment d’Espelette

Lynda Balslev is a cookbook author, food and travel writer, and recipe developer based in the San Francisco Bay area, where she lives with her Danish husband, two children, a cat and a dog. She studied cooking at Le Cordon Bleu Ecole de Cuisine in Paris and worked as a personal chef, culinary instructor, and food writer in Switzerland and Denmark. Her favorite activities include hiking, cooking dinners for her friends and family, and planning her next travel destination.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.